Saturday, 5 July 2008

More cookies ... or should that be biscuits?

Since I wrote my last post I am seeing cookies everywhere. I bought the new Frankie magazine and it contains a feature on biscuits. And also today, I came across a set of desktop icons based on biscuits that made me smile so I am using them on my Mac (but they make me hungry!).

Anyway, what IS the difference between a cookie and a biscuit? I have always wondered. Is cookie just an American word for the British biscuit, leaving us Australians as usual in the middle and hopelessly confused? Or are cookies only allowed to be round and hand-baked? Here are more cookies, they are hand-knitted by the womens organisation I work with in Bangladesh and they will soon be available through Lark. These are definitely cookies, although the British version we are also making (which includes jammy dodgers, custard creams and party rings) I will probably call biscuits!

9 comments:

CurlyPops said...

I think Biccies is a nice Aussie word to describe the lot....I'm loving those icons...they're hilarious!

trashalou said...

Not living in the US this something I struggle with A LOT b/c I hate it when my children use the word 'cookies'. They are sick of hearing me say 'Biscuits! We live in England - they have BISCUITS!'

Not that I get a litlle carried away on the unimportant stuff. Much.

Lark said...

Trashalou, I am the same - I am English 'tho living in Australia and I get slightly grumpy when my kids say garbage (rubbish), dessert (pudding), kinder (nursery), lollies (sweets) or icy poles (lolly-ices). And Curlypops you are right - biccies is a good ol' Australian word that is perfect for all types of cookies and biscuits!

lupinbunny said...

I think that if it's flat and round and has choc chips in it can be a cookie, but anything else - especially something with filling, topping, or thats shaped using a piping bag - is a biscuits. Collectively they're biscuits.

Calling a monte carlo or a timtam a 'cookie' is just wrong.

lupinbunny said...

eta: Lark, some of those are Australian-isms, not Americanisms! (or do you realise that and want sweet british children, not feral convict-kids? ;) ) Sweets for Brits, candy for Yanks, lollies for Australians. Icy poles and kindy and dessert are definitely, completely correct. Garbage is definitely american. eugh.

Kitschen Pink said...

I don't care what you call it as long as it's home baked, pretty and I can eat it! But I am reliably informed that biscuits is also used in America but to describe something other than a cookie - I can't remember what. But I think biscuit is just the English word for cookie. Just like cupcakes used to be buns before that word became more commonly used to describe boobs! (why?!) And what are muffins - just huge cupcakes for greedy people like me?! Like I said - if I can eat it....x

emma said...

I thought frankie was a bit harsh on the rice cookie. I really love them!
On the yank-talk side, my kids drive me crazy when they say "trash". What's wrong with rubbish?
Luckily we don't drink the fizzy stuff at our house because if I heard them call it "soda" I might explode!!

AnastasiaC said...

they are adorable Alison!! they look so cute!!
i call them bikkies too, it doesnt matter though, if they taste good I'll eat them...homemade bikkies are the best!

Jennifer said...

Too funny. SO here I am, an American, weighing in on "cookie" vs. "biscuit." For us, a cookie is sweet, baked (store-bought or homemade). Could have frosting (or should I say "icing"?), could be crisp and on the hard side like a gingersnap, could be soft and moist (like certain styles of chocolate chip cookies). A biscuit usually means a bread item -- a small, individual savory roll that gets served with a meal (with butter, or underneath some gravy). Then there's a cracker, which is always crisp and always savory (and usually salty). Our dog is named "Biscuit," but we laugh about what our friends from Ireland think that means about him (they think it means he's sweet; we think it means he's a little tough). These same friends from Ireland came over to visit and, passing through Customs in the US, said that they had "biscuits" in their bag. The American customs agent thought they said "brisket" and tore their luggage apart because you can't bring meat items over -- then got upset and said "those are COOKIES!" when our friends produced said biscuits.